INTEGRATING PROPERTY OWNERS AND
BUSINESSES—FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE CITY

The Challenge for Sustainability brings together commercial real estate and business leaders in Greater Boston to increase energy efficiency, minimize waste and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Challenge participants represent over 35 million square feet of space and are achieving real and measurable reductions by:

  • Benchmarking facilities’ environmental impact with our Sustainability Scorecard;
  • Engaging in monthly events for networking and learning;
  • Sharing success stories to highlight achievements and motivate others; and
  • Reducing CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions 18% since 2009, through the implementation of over 1,500 sustainability actions!

By coordinating their efforts, the Challenge for Sustainability and an elite group of businesses, property owners and institutions are positively impacting the environment, economic competitiveness, and quality of life of Greater Boston; preparing the region for a strong—and sustainable—future.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute joined the Challenge for Sustainability in 2013, with five participating properties; Dana-Farber Building, Jimmy Fund Building, Mayer Building, Shields Warren Building, Smith Building, and the Yawkey Building. In 2014, DFCI Shield’s Warren Building, was recognized at the 5th Annual Challenge Awards for achieving the ‘Greatest Energy Reduction’ for decreasing the building’s energy consumption by 21%, the equivalent of saving approximately 200,000 kWh of electricity.
Click here for the full case study!

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Featured Solution: “Capture Condensate

Capture condensate from chillers to be reused as gray water for cooling chilling towers or toilet facilities. When water vapor in the air comes into contact with a colder surface, the water changes from a gas to a liquid and collects on the surface. The water vapor that becomes a liquid is referred to as condensate. The condensate that collects on refrigeration equipment is potentially an alternate source of water.